Hiv

STUDY: Epilepsy Drug May Block AIDS Virus

STUDY: Epilepsy Drug May Block AIDS Virus
A drug developed to treat epilepsy seems to have a unintended and beneficial side effect according to a new lab study: the ability to inhibit the AIDS virus from fully infecting vulnerable CD4 cells.
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Infant's Treatment Yields Promising Results in Search for AIDS Cure

Infant's Treatment Yields Promising Results in Search for AIDS Cure
A promising study has effectively cured a Mississippi baby of the HIV he contracted in utero. This aggressive treatment is a step toward curing a disease long thought incurable.
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HIV Decriminalization Under the Microscope in MD

HIV Decriminalization Under the Microscope in MD
A Maryland lawmaker and a handful of local advocates have started the course to repeal the state’s HIV-specific criminal law. Efforts to repeal HIV criminalization laws are under way in several states, including as Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, and Washington.
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AIDS Council to CDC: Stop Criminalizing HIV/AIDS Patients

AIDS Council to CDC: Stop Criminalizing HIV/AIDS Patients
PACHA is also requesting that state and federal authorities review the cases of persons convicted under such laws and overturn convictions if deemed appropriate. The group is calling on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to “issue a clear statement addressing the growing evidence that HIV criminalization and punishments are counterproductive and undermine current HIV testing and prevention priorities.”
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Study: Criminalization of HIV Nondisclosure May Discourage Testing

A team of researchers has published findings that they say indicate criminalization of HIV nondisclosure may discourage testing and hinder efforts to prevent the spread of the disease.
The study, from Canada, found that a significant minority of men who have sex with men said that a series of high-profile criminal prosecutions related to HIV nondisclosure had impacted their willingness to get tested for the virus or to discuss risk factors with medical professionals. The researchers further reported that these individuals were more likely to engage in higher-risk sexual practices.
“Our results indicate that, although it is a minority of individuals (17.0 percent and 13.8 percent respectively) who reported that nondisclosure criminal prosecutions either (a) affected their willingness to get tested for HIV, or (b) made them afraid to speak with nurses and physicians about their sexual practices, this small group reported higher rates of unprotected penetrative anal intercourse and internal ejaculation with, on average, a higher number of different sexual partners within the previous 2 months,” wrote the study’s authors.
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