FCC

Former FCC Member: Broadband in State of Emergency, One Third of US Lacks Access

Former FCC Member: Broadband in State of Emergency, One Third of US Lacks Access
A former Federal Communications Commission member says that America's "communities of the ignored" — people with disabilities, minority and diversity groups, rural farmers and villagers, the inner city poor, and Native Americans — are facing stark obstacles in participating online in a world that progressively requires online participation.
origin Author: 
Ben Resnik
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Consumers to FCC: Kill 'Cold Texting'

A week before the 2012 presidential election, a marketing firm called ccAdvertising launched a political outreach campaign via text message.
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Absurdity Today: Tackling Email Privacy and Newspaper Monopoly

This week's top stories include: the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is working to change longstanding anti-consolidation legislation, the Federal Reserve Bank may now read your emails, and Barack Obama wins an Oscar...almost.
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FCC Clams Up on Its Own Transparency Initiative

When the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) passed a rule earlier this year to require TV stations to post political ad buying information online, public interest groups (and ProPublica) welcomed the policy as a means to get an unprecedented look at how billions of campaign dollars flow around the country. Now, the commission is refusing to even talk about the future of its own transparency initiative.
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Google Antitrust Settlement in Europe Would Impact US

In May, the European Commission said it was concerned that Google was favoring its own services in search, copying material from websites of competitors without permission, shutting out advertising competition and placing restrictions on the portability of online search advertising campaigns from its platform, AdWords, to the platforms of competitors. Commissioner Almunia told the company to offer changes or face a formal statement of objections with the risk of fines in the billions of dollars. In Europe antitrust penalties can be imposed before a court proceeding.
Besides the the European antitrust investigation, the Internet giant faces antitrust investigations by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and several states. Antitrust officials in Korea, India and Brazil are also looking into Google's business practices. A European deal could well serve as a blueprint for settlements with other authorities.
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