Defense spending

War Hungry Lawmakers May Have Had Their Fill of Iraq

War Hungry Lawmakers May Have Had Their Fill of Iraq
The prospect of the U.S. military returning to the fight in Iraq has turned congressional hawks into doves. Lawmakers who eagerly voted to authorize military force 12 years ago to oust Saddam Hussein and destroy weapons of mass destruction that were never found now harbor doubts that air strikes will turn back insurgents threatening Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government and Baghdad. Fears of Mideast quagmire and weariness after a decade of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan loom large for even those who talk tough on national security. More than 6,000 Americans died in those wars, which cost a trillion dollars.
origin Author: 
Donna Cassata and Bradley Klapper
origin Blog: 

Military Gets a Partial Pass on Foreign Aid Transparency Push

Military Gets a Partial Pass on Foreign Aid Transparency Push
Security assistance – a broad category that covers about $25 billion in yearly spending – skyrocketed in the wake of 9/11, growing by 227 percent from 2002 to 2012. A slew of recent reports from government watchdog agencies have found a glaring lack of accountability around security assistance. In 2012, Congress drafted a bill that would have subjected all foreign aid, including security assistance, to stricter monitoring and transparency requirements. The Pentagon successfully opposed the effort for security aid. The bill never made it to a vote.
origin Author: 
Cora Currier
origin Blog: