Defense of Marriage Act

SCOTUS Could Pick a Gay Marriage Case

November 30, 2012 looms large for the American Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community in it’s fight for equality. The nine justices of the Supreme Court will hold a closed-door conference to select which, if any, of the major LGBT cases they will hear.
The Supreme Court is not required to accept any certain number of the thousands of cases it is asked to review. In fact, during one term, there’s only enough time for the Court to hear 100 or so cases. If they do not accept a case, the decision of the lower court stands and it becomes the final ruling in the case. For instance, if the Supreme Court refuses to hear the lower court’s ruling against Prop 8, then legal same-sex marriage will return to California. The justices also have the option to postpone deciding whether to take a case holding it for consideration at a later conference.
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DOMA Doomed: Federal Appeals Court Rules Unconstitutional

A very Conservative judge has ruled DOMA, the Defense of Marriage Act, unconstitutional.
This clip from the Majority Report, live M-F at 12 noon EST and via daily podcast at http://Majority.FM
 
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Study in DOMA Constitutionality Defense Shown to be Influenced by Conservative Funders

When University of Texas professor Mark Regnerus released a study this summer portraying gay parents in a negative light, he insisted that the conservative funders who backed the research had no involvement in how it was designed, implemented, or interpreted.
But recently emerging evidence shows that a scholar affiliated at the time with the Witherspoon Institute — the socially conservative think tank that supplied the bulk of Regnerus’ funding — did indeed play a role carrying out and analyzing the study.
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