Crime and Punishment

CO Department of Corrections Ordered to Disclose Execution Plans

CO Department of Corrections Ordered to Disclose Execution Plans
The Colorado State Department of Corrections has been ordered to reveal details about how it carries out executions. This follows a state-wide conversation begun by Governor John Hickenlooper regarding the necessity and efficacy of state-sponsored lethal sentences.
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Feds Probe Denver for Violating Deaf Prisoner Rights

Feds Probe Denver for Violating Deaf Prisoner Rights
The federal Justice Department is investigating Denver – which touts itself as “one of America’s most accessible cities” — for failing to provide sign-language interpreters for deaf prisoners.
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CO’s Death Penalty: Spending Millions to Execute Almost No One

CO’s Death Penalty: Spending Millions to Execute Almost No One
With a bill to repeal the death penalty likely to be introduced in the 2013 Colorado Legislature, there are bound to be philosophical arguments about the merits of capital punishment. One thing that seems beyond debate, though, is that ending the death penalty could save Colorado taxpayers a lot of money.
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Majority of US HIV Criminal Laws Date Back to 1990's

A member of the first federal commission to look at the HIV epidemic says it is “probably past time” for states to revisit their HIV-specific criminal laws.
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Study: Criminalization of HIV Nondisclosure May Discourage Testing

A team of researchers has published findings that they say indicate criminalization of HIV nondisclosure may discourage testing and hinder efforts to prevent the spread of the disease.
The study, from Canada, found that a significant minority of men who have sex with men said that a series of high-profile criminal prosecutions related to HIV nondisclosure had impacted their willingness to get tested for the virus or to discuss risk factors with medical professionals. The researchers further reported that these individuals were more likely to engage in higher-risk sexual practices.
“Our results indicate that, although it is a minority of individuals (17.0 percent and 13.8 percent respectively) who reported that nondisclosure criminal prosecutions either (a) affected their willingness to get tested for HIV, or (b) made them afraid to speak with nurses and physicians about their sexual practices, this small group reported higher rates of unprotected penetrative anal intercourse and internal ejaculation with, on average, a higher number of different sexual partners within the previous 2 months,” wrote the study’s authors.
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