working class

Food Stamps Mean Vacations in Barbados: The Right Wing Welfare Fantasy

Food Stamps Mean Vacations in Barbados: The Right Wing Welfare Fantasy
There are many myths perpetuated and consumed by the extreme Right on any number of issues, but perhaps none as vitriolic as those spread about government assistance to the poor. Why are welfare and food stamps so vilified by GOP and its voting base?
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On the Legacy of Ed Schultz and What His Move to the Weekend Means

On the Legacy of Ed Schultz and What His Move to the Weekend Means
Was Ed Schultz sidelined or did he go willingly? There are conflicting accounts.
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How Corporations Have Betrayed American Workers

How Corporations Have Betrayed American Workers
Free market idealists argue that capitalism works for anyone with a little initiative and a willingness to work hard. That might be true if job opportunities were available to everyone.
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The Changing Working Class

In the old progressive narrative of American culture, everyone would do better over time. The son of a miner with an 8th grade education would graduate from high school, and even if he got an industrial job, stronger unions and general prosperity would mean that he worked fewer hours than his father and earned enough to buy a small house.
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Stereotyping the White Working Class

Democrats cannot do better among working-class whites if they envision them as a uniform group that thinks and feels the same way everywhere, as the political pros quite often do. That is, an overwhelmingly middle-class and upper-class set of politicians, operatives, and pundits appear to have so little direct experience of working-class people of any color that they consistently fall into stereotyping that clouds their vision and often insults the voters they are trying to persuade.
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Income Inequality in New Jersey

More than 75 percent of the additional income generated in New Jersey went to the top 20 percent of households, with the richest 1 percent receiving the bulk of the increase. The bottom 40 percent lost income and everyone else experienced stagnate income or minimal growth that failed to keep pace with inflationary costs.
According to the report this growing divide has hurt the vulnerable the most, including single mothers, ethnic minorities and those with less education.
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