wages

Prevailing Wage Dispute Propels Cincinnati City Council to Look at Irresponsible Contracting

In an interesting break from bureaucratic business as usual, the City Council of Cincinnati has used an incident in which subcontractors were not paying the prevailing wage to spark a conversation about how the city can better monitor city-funded projects.
It’s a classic case: a prime contractor on a large project hired a subcontractor who then contracted out more work and along the way someone didn’t get paid fairly. The prim...
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

Dept. of Labor Collects $430,000 in Back Wages for MN Workers

A government investigation has found 59 employees who hung drywall on projects that were federally-funded were not paid the appropriate prevailing wage.
The U.S. Department of Labor has collected $430,000 in back wages for the subcontracted workers who did work in Woodbury, MN on the Uptown at City Walk housing project, the city hall, library and senior center construction project in St. Michael. All projects mandated prevailing wages according to Pioneer Press.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

Victory for Forced Labor in Walmart's US Supply Chain

The National Guestworker Alliance just announced a huge victory. The C.J.’s Seafood workers who exposed forced labor on the Wal-Mart supply chain in June were vindicated by the federal government, which granted them U-Visas—special visas for victims of serious crimes. This is an extraordinary victory for worker organizing and labor law enforcement in the U.S.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

Low Pay Isn’t the Solution to Economic Problems; It’s the Cause

Unions aren’t a third party entity; they are simply a group of people who have agreed to work together. Instead of bargaining individually, they bargain collectively (that’s why the contract is called a collective bargaining agreement.) When you mock unions, you mock workers – probably workers like you – who have a skill and feel like they should make a fair wage for that skill.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

OH State Treasurer, Now a Senate Candidate, Shorts the State in Payroll Taxes

In Ohio, Senate incumbent Democrat Sherrod Brown is accusing his challenger, State Treasurer Josh Mandel, of depriving the state of tax money by incorrectly classifying the employees of his 2010 campaign as independent contractors.
According to campaign finance disclosures analyzed by Alex Seitz-Wald of Salon, Mandel misclassified at least 9 of his senior staffers in order to forgo paying payroll taxes to the state. While misclassifiying workers in any situation is wrong, the irony of Mandel’s maneuver as State Treasurer is unmistakable.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

Researchers: Current System Inflates CEO Pay Beyond Merit

There is a theory in corporate America that CEOs must be paid top dollar for their skills in order to keep them from constantly shopping their skills to the highest bidder. But a new study by Craig K. Ferrere and Charles M. Elson, director of the John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware, debunks that theory and shows that CEO skills are often non-transferable. Further, the study shows that one of the main factors in determining CEO pay rates, the peer-group benchmark, is woefully ineffective and drives up pay rates for less qualified CEOs.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

Investigation Reveals Wage Violations in Low-Income Housing Construction in NYC

A union-led investigation alleges that construction workers building low-income housing for the City of New York are being paid under the table and cheated out of wages.
The District Council of Mason Tenders conducted the investigation, releasing it a day before a vote was expected to override Mayor Bloomberg’s veto of a wage bill that originally passed through the City Council by a 45-0 margin.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

In 2011, More Workers Made Below the Minimum Wage Than Those Actually Earning It

Thoroughly reviewed Bureau of Labor Statistics data from last year indicate that, in the United States, there are currently more workers earning below the minimum wage than there are workers actually making the minimum wage itself.
The data, Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers: 2011, found that 2.2 million workers make below the minimum wage compared to 1.7 million who make the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. Other interesting (i.e. depressing) data points include:
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

REPORT: Between ’01 and ’11, Trade Deficit With China Eliminated or Displaced 2.7 Million US Jobs

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) reveals the effect that China’s admittance to the World Trade Organization (WTO) has had on U.S. workers and the domestic economy.
According to Robert E. Scott, researcher of The China Toll, “between 2001 and 2011, the trade deficit with China eliminated or displaced more than 2.7 million U.S. jobs, over 2.1 million of which (76.9 percent) were in manufacturing.”
Nearly 2.7 million jobs have been lost to China. 662,100 of these losses came between 2008-2011 according to the study. The computer and electronics industry has been hit particularly hard with 1,064,800 jobs displaced, 38.8 percent of the 2001–2011 total.
Wages of workers with less than a four year college degree have been driven down by competition from less developed countries. Roughly 70 percent of that workforce, nearly 100 million workers, have felt the chilling effect.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

40% of America’s Workers Live Paycheck to Paycheck

America’s workers are existing on the edge of financial disaster: 40 percent say they live paycheck to paycheck, according to a recent CareerBuilder survey. Worse, 37 percent say they sometimes need to rely on the next payday to make ends meet. Although the percentage of those literally living for payday has decreased from 42 percent in 2011 and from 46 percent in 2008, the height of the recession, this not good news.
origin Author: 
origin Blog: 

Pages