Supreme Court

The Other Crucial Civil Rights Case the Supreme Court Will be Ruling On

Last month, the Supreme Court said it will consider the constitutionality of a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the hallmark legislation from the Civil Rights era that has come under increased challenge. The cornerstone provision is known as Section 5, which holds some states accountable to get federal clearance before making any changes to their voting laws.
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Who Is Election Energy, and Why It Matters

Last week, we discussed Verified Twitter Accounts - specifically, that Minnesota Supreme Court Justice G. Barry Anderson had one. On Monday, we looked at Chief Justice Lorie Gildea's expenses on her Campaign Finance Reports ("CFB") for her campaign website - well, specifically, the lack thereof.
Today, we're going to look at website expenses for the campaign of Supreme Court Justice G. Barry Anderson - and several other prominent Republicans. We'll start with one such prominent Republican, the soon-to-be former GOP Senate Caucus Leader Dave Senjem.
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A Look At MN Chief Justice's Campaign Finance Reports

Last week, we discussed Verified Twitter Accounts - specifically, that Minnesota Supreme Court Justice G. Barry Anderson had one, and we were looking at his re-election Campaign Finance Reports. And we are; stay tuned for what's turned up! While doing so, we also took a look at two of the other candidates for re-election to the Supreme Court - Justice David Stras, who also had a Twitter Verified Account, and Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, who didn't. Something stuck out while going through Chief Justice Gildea's reports - by omission.
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Should the Supreme Court Enforce a Code of Ethics on Itself?

It’s the first Monday in October, so the big news outlets and legal blogs were full over the weekend of stories and posts on the opening of the Supreme Court’s 2012-13 term.
The new term begins with the court still refusing to formally adopt for itself the ethical code it enforces at every other level of the federal judiciary. The Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges instructs judges to maintain their independence by acting “without fear or favor.” It tells judges to disqualify themselves from cases in which they or members of their family have a personal interest, to take care to obey laws requiring them to disclose their personal finances and to avoid any involvement in partisan politics, among other things.
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GOP Slouching Back Towards Todd Akin

So what is new in Todd Akin's campaign for the Missouri Senate? Lots of sheepish Republican movers and shakers, that's what. An enthusiastic Newt Gingrich led the way, Jim DeMint followed, flourishing a check-book, and now Roy Blunt, rather obviously holding his nose, is back on board with Brother Todd:
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Big Business Meddles In Judicial Elections

Earlier this August concerned citizens gathered at the Center for American Progress to discuss the role of big money in state Supreme Court races. This discussion, featuring Justice Nelson of Montana and Justice Oliver Diaz of Mississippi, followed a release of the CFAP’s report: “Big Business Taking over State Supreme Courts: How Campaign Contributions to Judges Tip the Scales Against Individuals.”
It’s become apparent that the control of the judiciary is now in play. While the judges who sit on the Supreme Court of the United States are appointed, many of those on state Supreme Courts are elected, making them increasingly more disposed to influence from big donors in this post-Citizens United world.
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Campaign Finance Could Threaten Impartiality of Elected Judges

Campaign Finance Could Threaten Impartiality of Elected Judges
A staggering 39 states elect at least some of their judges, typically for appellate positions. Since 2009, judicial campaigns have been flooded with donations from unregulated superPACs, many of which are funded by huge corporations.
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Growing List of Fortune 500 Companies 'Coming Out' in Support of Marriage Equality

In Golinski v. United States Office of Personnel Management, an amicus brief has been filed by 70 businesses, trade groups, and cities in support of the plaintiff, Golinski, and marriage equality.
Some of the high profile companies and municipal employers include: Microsoft, CBS, Levi Strauss, Starbucks, Viacom, Electronic Arts, eBay, Xerox, Google and the cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Boston and Seattle. This is important because while the Administration is making a case for "equal protection under the law" these employers are making one based on economics.
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