Civil Rights

The Other Crucial Civil Rights Case the Supreme Court Will be Ruling On

Last month, the Supreme Court said it will consider the constitutionality of a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the hallmark legislation from the Civil Rights era that has come under increased challenge. The cornerstone provision is known as Section 5, which holds some states accountable to get federal clearance before making any changes to their voting laws.
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Majority of US HIV Criminal Laws Date Back to 1990's

A member of the first federal commission to look at the HIV epidemic says it is “probably past time” for states to revisit their HIV-specific criminal laws.
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Churches Around the Country Used Political Messaging Near Polling Places

In South Saint Paul, Minn., on Election Day, residents showed up at St. John Vianney Catholic Church to vote and were greeted with a banner outside the polling place entrance that read, “Strengthen Marriage, Don’t Redefine It.”
Minnesota was voting on a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage, and the Catholic Church had been the most vocal proponent of the ballot measure.
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Voting Rights Win! (For Now...)

Author Ari Berman brings us up to date on the latest news in voter rights, on a positive note state courts have been overturning voter ID laws across the country, but the Supreme Court may reverse parts of the Voting Rights Act.
This clip from the Majority Report, live M-F at 12 noon EST and via daily podcast at http://Majority.FM
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Is Religious Extremism Behind Recent OK State Health Decisions?

The war on women continues here in Oklahoma.
On Thursday, the Tulsa World reported that the Oklahoma Department of Health will no longer allow three Planned Parenthood facilities in Tulsa to participate in the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program.
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Intel's Donation Fund to Require Boy Scout Troops to Sign Nondiscrimination Pledge

Intel has revealed new details about its plan to exclude organizations that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation from its corporate giving, a move that could cost some Boy Scout troops thousands of dollars in donations.
In September, a TAI report showed that the company had given $700,000 to various Boy Scout groups in 2010 through its “Intel Involved” volunteer matching grant program — despite the Scouts’ policy excluding gays and lesbians.
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Backers of Minnesota Marriage Amendment Use Controversial Parenting Study

Conducted by University of Texas sociologist Mark Regnerus, the National Family Structures Study has been used by opponents of same-sex marriage to suggest that the children of same-sex couples fare poorly on a number of issues including relationships, abuse, and poverty.
But that’s not what the study actually says. Regnerus’ study compared children from families headed by married, heterosexual parents to children who were raised in families where one parent had a same-sex relationship at some point. The vast majority of the children whose parents had a same-sex relationship were either born out of wedlock or came from a “traditional family” that experienced a divorce. Critics say that comparison is unfair because it compares broken homes to married ones.
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Study: Criminalization of HIV Nondisclosure May Discourage Testing

A team of researchers has published findings that they say indicate criminalization of HIV nondisclosure may discourage testing and hinder efforts to prevent the spread of the disease.
The study, from Canada, found that a significant minority of men who have sex with men said that a series of high-profile criminal prosecutions related to HIV nondisclosure had impacted their willingness to get tested for the virus or to discuss risk factors with medical professionals. The researchers further reported that these individuals were more likely to engage in higher-risk sexual practices.
“Our results indicate that, although it is a minority of individuals (17.0 percent and 13.8 percent respectively) who reported that nondisclosure criminal prosecutions either (a) affected their willingness to get tested for HIV, or (b) made them afraid to speak with nurses and physicians about their sexual practices, this small group reported higher rates of unprotected penetrative anal intercourse and internal ejaculation with, on average, a higher number of different sexual partners within the previous 2 months,” wrote the study’s authors.
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